Risks of Animal and Plant Infectious Diseases Through Trade (Rapid Trade)

Co-Principal Investigators:

 

 

Overview

This is a Natural Science Foundation funded grant, contracted via a sub award from Arizona State University and implemented by the Department of Agriculture, Food and Resource Economics at MSU.  

The spread of infectious diseases of both domesticated and wild animals and plants are among the consequences of the growth in world trade. Livestock diseases historically spread through trade.  Recent work on infectious diseases of humans has explored the epidemiological implications of decisions about how much contact to make and with whom. It has shown that infectious disease risks are determined endogenously as a function of the relative costs and benefits of illness and contact. 

Collaborating partners implementing RAPID Trade will evaluate the disease risks associated with imports of selected animals and animal products, and selected plants and plant products to the UK and the USA. The team will focus on the factors informing trade decisions, including relative prices, taxes and import duties, along with assessment, inspection and interception strategies. They will estimate the national and global risks resulting from risk management at three scales: the scale of the importer; the national scale and the international scale.

At MSU/AFRE, Professor Richard Horan will work on integrating human behavioral models and epidemiological models into bio economics optimization and simulation models, and he will use these to quantify economic and epidemiological tradeoffs and predict outcomes under various policy settings. He will also work as part of the project leadership group that will responsibility for overall project performance,  coordination between collaborating institutions, dissemination of project results,  resolution of conflicts within the research team, broader impacts and outreach, and mentoring.

Implementation Sept 2014 – August 2018.

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